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Women’s Equality Day: Author Talk with Tina Cassidy

Friday, August 21
7- 8 p.m.

Tina Cassidy, author of Mr. President, How Long Must We Wait? Alice Paul, Woodrow Wilson and the Fight for the Right to Vote will be interviewed by journalist Pam Platt. Cassidy writes about women and culture. She is also the author of Birth: The Surprising History of How We Are Born; and Jackie After O: One Remarkable Year When Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Defied Expectations and Rediscovered Her Dreams. Books may be ordered online at www.carmichaelsbookstore.com. This is a virtual event in collaboration with Carmichael’s Book Store. Register at www.fraziermuseum.org/wed.

 

Women’s Equality Day

Saturday, August 22
9 a.m.- Noon

Presented by the Louisville Metro Office for Women, the League of Women Voters Louisville, and the Frazier History Museum, a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment and includes presentations and inspiring speakers. Poet and artist Hannah Drake will present an original work, Tina Cassidy, author of Mr. President, How Long Must We Wait? Alice Paul, Woodrow Wilson and the Fight for the Right to Vote will offer the keynote address. Visit www.fraziermuseum.org/calendar-of-events for more information.

 

Let’s Talk | Bridging the Divide: What is a Vote Worth?

Tuesday, September 8
6 -7 p.m.

What is a vote worth? With the November election drawing near, we tackle that question as we commemorate the centennial of a woman’s right to vote, look at the recent bipartisan agreement on absentee ballots in Kentucky’s primary elections, and address ongoing concerns about voter suppression. Panelists include Joshua Douglas, Professor at the University of Kentucky’s College of Law; Michael Adams, Secretary of State (KY); Rick Green, Editor of The Courier Journal; Sadiqa Reynolds, President of the Louisville Urban League; and Amina Elahi, City Reporter at WFPL. Co-moderated by Rachel Platt and Renee Shaw, host of KET’s Kentucky Tonight. Register at www.fraziermuseum.org/calendar-of-events/what-is-a-vote-worth.

Celebrating the 19th Amendment
By: Jennifer Kleier and Delores "Dee" Pregliasco

 

Websites:

National League of Women Voters

National Women's History Alliance

Kentucky League of Women Voters

Louisville League of Women Voters

 

Podcasts:

 

Videos:

Suffrage in 60 Seconds Video Series

KET Presents: The National Votes for Women Trail

Remember the Ladies: Angela Dodson and Betty Baye in Conversation

What is a Vote Worth? Suffrage Then and Now

Now on view at the Frazier History Museum
Sponsored by Wells Fargo

On August 18, 1920, Congress ratified the 19th Amendment granting women the legal right to vote. This year, the Frazier History Museum, the League of Women Voters of Louisville (LWVL), and the Louisville Metro Office for Women (OFW) have come together to mark the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment and the 55th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, which prohibits racial discrimination in voting, with an exhibit at the Frazier sponsored by Wells Fargo.

What is a Vote Worth? Suffrage Then and Now examines the women’s suffrage movement in the U.S., while zeroing in on features of the movement in Kentucky — its stars and villains, triumphs and defeats.

 

BallotBox

Now on view at Louisville Metro Hall

BallotBox is a contemporary art exhibit examining past and present voting rights and the intersection of the 19th Amendment, the Voting Rights Act and this big election year. The exhibit will run through Dec. 4 at Louisville Metro Hall, 527 W. Jefferson St., Louisville. The exhibit is free and open to the public during regular Metro Hall hours. BallotBox can also be viewed virtually HERE.

 

Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote

Now on view at the National Archives Museum

The National Archives commemorates the centennial of the 19th Amendment’s ratification with its newest exhibit, Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote. The exhibition features more than 90 items—including the original 19th Amendment and other records, artifacts, and photographs—that look beyond suffrage parades and protests to the often overlooked story behind this landmark moment in American history. This fuller retelling of the struggle for women’s voting rights highlights the dynamic engagement of diverse suffragists in the struggle to win the vote for one half of the people. The exhibit can be viewed virtually HERE.